Calling all (wood shop) kids!

spoon carving

I’d like to see more kids and young adults work wood. Probably a lot of other people would like to see that, too. In order to encourage more young people to get into woodworking we’ll be showcasing projects from young people in upcoming issues of the magazine. The challenging part is that I’d love if these articles were also written by a kid or young adult.

spoon carving
Spoon Carving – This is my son, who was eight at the time, carving a spoon. I included this photo in an article titled “How to Teach an Eight-Year-Old to Carve a Spoon” in our Aug/Sept 2020 issue on making wooden spoons.

I started to put the word out over the past few days on social media and the CW&HI woodworking and DIY forum and the response has been good. Although there are no set rules, the goal is to get people between the ages of about 10 and 20 to write simple, fun project articles for our print and digital magazine. They can be really simple projects, and geared towards someone that age. I’m thinking everything from birdhouses and pencil cases to a name sign for a bedroom door and a marshmallow catapult. I think a tablet stand would also go over well with kids. My goal is for a good mix of projects for kids and young adults, written by kids and young adults.

Woodworking kids
Great Gifts – This is my 11-year-old daughter scroll-sawing a snowflake ornament for a Christmas gift.

Writing an article for our pages isn’t rocket science, though it does require a certain skill set. Some woodworking knowledge, the ability to take a decent photo and the writing skills to put together a few descriptive paragraphs are the three main aspects needed for an article for CW&HI. Having said that, I doubt there are many kids out there who possess all three of these traits, so I’m hoping some keen parents and teachers will get involved to help out with a few of the details.

Pass it on!

Send me an email with a bit of information about what project your kids would like to write about and we can chat about a good approach to making this happen. I’m happy to provide pointers about how to write an article for a woodworking magazine and take photos that are clear and helpful to readers. I can provide a list of things to consider when building and writing, so the process goes smoothly. And please pass this onto any woodworkers you know who have kids or young adults. If all goes well, there will be a new generation of woodworkers in Canada who have a place to look for fun projects while they develop their skills.

Wood Symphony Gallery’s 2021 exhibition

Last week I shared Wood Symphony Gallery’s 2021 online exhibition with you and mentioned some of the stunning pieces that were produced by wood artists all over the world. One of our readers asked if I could get hold of some of these artists and talk to them about how they made their pieces. That way, our readers could get some tips, and maybe even try their hand at making something with similar techniques. I thought it was a great idea, but with so many pieces in the exhibition, I didn’t know where to start.

Coral Reef Vessel #6
“Coral Reef Vessel #6” – Steve Miller made this heavily textured, 12″ tall maple vessel.
Coral Reef Vessel #6 detail
Great Texture and Finish – If you’d like to know more about how Miller added the texture to the surface of this vessel or applied the finish, let me know. There are many other fascinating pieces in the exhibition, too.

Check out their online exhibition and if there’s a piece you’d like to know more about, either post which one you’d like to learn about in the comments section or send me an email. I can’t promise these artists will get back to me, let alone give me any trade secrets, but I can promise to at least contact them and ask. I bet they will even be pleased to know their work struck a chord with woodworkers from Canada. When you let me know what piece you’d like to know more about, include a few specific questions you’d like me to ask, and I’ll take it from there. Check out WoodSymphony.com to see all the pieces.

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